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ASK THE EXPERTS

Ask the experts: Sources of calcium

Ask the experts: Sources of calcium

Q. “I can’t stand the smell or the thought of drinking or eating dairy products. I do eat edam cheese but obviously that’s not enough. Which other ways can I get calcium? I am 44 years old.”

Karen

A. HFG nutritionist Claire Turnbull responds:

As an adult female, your need for calcium is around 1000mg per day. When you reach your 50s, your daily need increases to 1300mg. Canned fish such as salmon and sardines, eaten with the bones, have a good amount of calcium (if you mash them well you never really notice the bones). Tofu also has calcium, as do green vegetables, nuts and dried figs. Without dairy products, however, it can be tricky to get your daily 1000mg given the limited numbers of foods with significant amounts of calcium per serve.

As well as trying to include dairy alternatives, it may be worth seeing if you could manage a low-fat, calcium-enriched soy milk when it is made into a delicious smoothie with banana and berries. Or try making your own custard (without too much sugar) as another way to use milk or a milk-alternative without you‘ feeling’ like you are having milk. If this isn’t possible and you feel you are unable to get the calcium you need through your diet, head to your GP: you may need a scan to check the density of your bones and from there you may be recommended to take a supplement if necessary.

Calcium content of foods

FoodServing sizeCalcium (mg)
Canned salmon with bones100g250mg
Canned sardines with bones100g550mg
Tofu150g160mg
Broccoli (cooked)1 cup60mg
Almonds1/4 cup90mg
Dried figs4 figs130mg
Trim milk1 cup380mg
Calci-trim milk1 cup520mg
Lite soy milk1 cup310mg
Edam cheese40g310mg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First published: Jun 2012

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